Syndrome definitions for drug overdose: How far down the rabbit hole do we go?

State and local jurisdictions have been exploring the use of SyS data to monitor suspected drug overdose outbreaks in their communities. With the increasing awareness and use of SyS systems, staff from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) worked to develop several queries that jurisdictions could use to better capture suspected drug overdose visits. In 2017, CDC released their first two queries on heroin overdose and opioid overdose, followed in 2018 by stimulant and all drug overdose queries.

June 18, 2019

Using Evaluation to Inform the BioSense Platform: Results from a 2018 Survey

Since 2015, CDC’s Division of Health Informatics and Surveillance staff have conducted evaluations to provide information on the utility, functionality, usability and user satisfaction associated with the National Syndromic Surveillance Program’s BioSense Platform tools.

June 18, 2019

Using Syndromic Surveillance to Classify and Capture Non-Fatal Occupational Injuries and Illnesses

This study uses data from the New Jersey syndromic surveillance system (EpiCenter) as a data source to enhance surveillance of current non-fatal occupational injuries, illnesses, and poisonings. EpiCenter was originally developed for early detection and monitoring of the health of communities using chief complaints from people seeking acute care in hospital emergency rooms to identify health trends. Currently, syndromic surveillance has not been widely applied to identify occupational injuries and illnesses.

June 18, 2019

Validating Syndromic Data for Opioid Overdose Surveillance in Florida

In 2017, FL Department of Health (DOH) became one of thirty-two states plus Washington, D.C funded by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) under the ESOOS program. One of the objectives of this funding was to increase the timeliness of reporting on non-fatal opioid overdoses through syndromic surveillance utilizing either the emergency department (ED) or Emergency Medical Services (EMS) data systems. Syndromic case validation is an essential requirement under ESOOS for non-fatal opioid-involved overdose (OIOD).

June 18, 2019

Validation of a surveillance-based definition for hepatitis B treatment eligibility.

Approximately 100,000 New York City (NYC) residents are currently diagnosed with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection.1 Routine monitoring and treatment, where indicated, are necessary to reduce HBV disease progression. Using the 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) 2 guidelines on HBV infection management, we developed a surveillance-based definition for treatment eligibility.

June 18, 2019

Communicating the detection capabilities of syndromic surveillance systems

Increasingly public health decision-makers are using syndromic surveillance for real-time reassurance and situational awareness in addition to early warning1. Decision-makers using intelligence, including syndromic data, need to understand what the systems are capable of detecting, what they cannot detect and specifically how much reassurance should be inferred when syndromic systems report nothing detected. In this study we quantify the detection capabilities of syndromic surveillance systems used by Public Health England (PHE).

June 18, 2019

Comparing Syndromic Data to Discharge Data to Measure Opioid Overdose Emergency Department Visits

Timely and accurate measurement of overdose morbidity using emergency department (ED) data is necessary to inform an effective public health response given the dynamic nature of opioid overdose epidemic in the United States. However, from jurisdiction to jurisdiction, differing sources and types of ED data vary in their quality and comprehensiveness. Many jurisdictions collect timely emergency department data through syndromic surveillance (SyS) systems, while others may have access to more complete, but slower emergency department discharge datasets.

June 18, 2019

Evaluation of a Acute Febrile Illness Surveillance Network (GAFINet), South Korea.

After MERS outbreak in 2015, the provincial government and infectious disease control center (GIDCC) initiated an emergency department (ED) based Gyeonggi-do provincial acute febrile illness (AFI) surveillance network (GAFINet) to monitor for a subsequent outbreak of emerging or imported infectious diseases since September 2016. Following pilot operation from September to December 2016, the operation was run for one year from June 2017 to May 2018.

June 18, 2019

Evaluation of First Electronic Case Reports received in Illinois

Communicable disease reporting from providers can be a time-consuming process that results in delayed or incomplete reporting of infectious diseases, limiting public health's ability to respond quickly to prevent or control disease. The recent development of an HL7 standard for automated Electronic initial case reports (eICR) represents an important advancement for public health surveillance.

June 18, 2019

Evaluation of REDCap to Supplement Foodborne Disease Surveillance Systems

The Tennessee Department of Health (TDH) Foodborne Disease Program conducts routine surveillance for foodborne illnesses and enteric disease outbreaks and participates in statewide enhanced surveillance as part of the Foodborne Disease Center for Outbreak Response Enhancement (FoodCORE) and the Foodborne Diseases Active Surveillance Network (FoodNet) supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). TDH uses the CDC NEDSS Base System (NBS) application for routine disease surveillance.

June 18, 2019

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