Mobile Technology Systems for Surveillance in Low Resource Settings

Description: 

Mobile technology provides opportunities to monitor and improve health in areas of the world where resources are scarce. Poor infrastructure and the lack of access to medical services for millions have led to increased usage of mobile technology for health related purposes in recent years. As adoption has increased, so has its acceptance as a viable technology for health data collection. The ability to provide timely, accurate, and informed responses to emerging outbreaks of disease and other health threats makes mobile technology highly suitable for use in surveillance data collection activities and within the arena of global health informatics overall. The American Public Health Association defines global health informatics as the application of information and communication technologies to improve health in low-resource settings, which include the following: linking disparate sources of data together through natural language processing, use of mobile health technologies for disease surveillance, use of telemedicine to manage chronic disease, use of digital libraries to increase knowledge and awareness of public health events. 

 

Objective 

To present the prevailing global public health informatics landscape in developing countries highlighting current mobile system requirements and usage for disease surveillance and revealing gaps in the technology.

Primary Topic Areas: 
Original Publication Year: 
2011
Event/Publication Date: 
December, 2011

May 02, 2019

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