Optimization of Linkage between North Carolina EMS and ED Data: EMS Naloxone Cases

The opioid overdose crisis has rapidly expanded in North Carolina (NC), paralleling the epidemic across the United States. The number of opioid overdose deaths in NC has increased by nearly 40% each year since 2015.1 Critical to preventing overdose deaths is increasing access to the life-saving drug naloxone, which can reverse overdose symptoms and progression.

June 18, 2019

Identifying Emergency Department Care in the Year Prior to Suicide Death

Suicide is a leading cause of mortality in the United States, causing about 45,000 deaths annually. Research suggests that universal screening in health care settings may be beneficial for prevention, but few studies have combined detailed suicide circumstances with ED encounter data to better understand care-seeking behavior prior to death.

Objective: To identify potential emergency department (ED) visits prior to suicide deaths in North Carolina (NC) and describe pre-suicide care-seeking in EDs.

June 18, 2019

Evaluation of Pedestrian/Bicycle Crash Injury Case Definitions for Use with NC DETECT

Over the last few decades, the United States has made considerable progress in decreasing the incidence of motor vehicle occupants injured and killed in traffic collisions.1 However, there is still a need for continued motor vehicle crash (MVC) injury surveillance, particularly for vulnerable road users, such as pedestrians and bicyclists.

June 18, 2019

Beyond Mortality: Violent Injury Surveillance Using NC DETECT ED Visit Data

Violence-related injuries are a major source of morbidity and mortality in NC. From 2005-2014, suicide and homicide ranked as NC's 11th and 16th causes of death, respectively. In 2014, there were 1,932 total violent deaths, of which 1,303 were due to suicide (67%), 536 due to homicide (28%), and 93 due to another mechanism of violent injury (5%).

January 19, 2018

Informing Public Health Prevention in NC Using Falls Surveillance Data

Falls are a leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injury in NC. As the size of the older adult population is predicted to increase over the next few decades, it is likely that the incidence of falls-related morbidity and mortality will increase in tandem. In order to address this public health emergency, the Injury and Violence Prevention Branch (IVPB) of the NC Division of Public Health has partnered with the Carolina Center for Health Informatics (CCHI) in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to perform falls surveillance activities.

January 21, 2018

Motor Vehicle Crash (MVC) Case Definitions and How They Impact MVC Surveillance

In 2012, an estimated 2.5 million people presented to the ED for a MVC injury in the U.S. National injury surveillance is commonly captured using E-codes. However, use of E-codes alone to capture MVC-related ED visits may result in a different picture of MVC injuries compared to using text searches of triage or chief compliant notes.

Objective

September 01, 2017

Triage Notes in Syndromic Surveillance – A Double Edged Sword

The advent of Meaningful Use (MU) has allowed for the expansion of data collected at the hospital level and received by public health for syndromic surveillance. The triage note, a free text expansion on the chief complaint, is one of the many variables that are becoming commonplace in syndromic surveillance data feeds. Triage notes are readily available in many ED information systems, including, but not limited to, Allscripts, Cerner, EPIC, HMS, MedHost, Meditech, and T-System.

September 20, 2017

Lessons Learned from the Transition to ICD-10-CM: Redefining Syndromic Surveillance Case Definitions for NC DETECT

NC DETECT receives ICD-9-CM codes for emergency department (ED) visits and uses these codes in case definitions for syndromic surveillance (e.g. infectious disease, injury, etc.). Hospitals will begin using ICD-10-CM codes on October 1, 2015. As a result, preparations have been made to accommodate ICD-10-CM codes in NC DETECT for data transmission, receipt, processing and use in the NC DETECT Web Application.

Objective

To describe lessons learned from the transition to ICD-10-CM.

October 13, 2017

Assessing the Potential Impact of the BioSense 24-hour Rule Using NC DETECT ED Data

Per a frequently asked questions document on the ISDS website, approximately two thirds of HL7 records received in BioSense do not provide a Visit ID. As a result, BioSense data processing rules use the patient ID, facility ID and earliest date in the record to identify a unique visit. If the earliest dates in records with the same patient ID and facility ID occur within the same 24-hour time frame, those two visits are combined into one visit and the earliest date will be stored.

September 28, 2017

Childhood Injury in Wake County, NC: Local Use of Public Health Surveillance Data

A local foundation commissioned a project to determine the leading causes of childhood injury in Wake County, NC. Multiple sources of secondary data, including syndromic surveillance data, were used to describe leading causes of childhood injury in the county.

Objective

To utilize secondary data sources to describe childhood injury and prioritize prevention efforts in Wake County, NC.
 

October 10, 2017

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