Using probabilistic matching to improve opioid drug overdose surveillance, New Jersey

The opioid drug overdose crisis presents serious challenges to state-based public health surveillance programs, not the least of which is uncertainty in the detection of cases in existing data systems. New Jersey historically had slightly higher unintentional drug overdose death rates than the national average, but by 2001 dramatic increases in drug overdose deaths in states like West Virginia began to drive up the national rate (Figure 1).

June 18, 2019

Trends in Injection Opioid Use and Bloodborne Pathogen Related Diseases in New Jersey

When the opioid epidemic began in the early 1990s, pills such as oxycodone were the primary means of abuse.

June 18, 2019

Travel and Triage: Pilot project to detect infections after medical tourism procedures

EpiCenter, NJ’s statewide syndromic surveillance system, collects ED registration data. The system uses chief complaint data to classify ED visits into syndrome categories and provides alerts to state and local health departments for surveillance anomalies. After the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) started collecting medical notes including triage notes, which contain more specific ED visit information than chief complaint, from 10 EDs to strengthen HAI syndromic surveillance efforts.

January 25, 2018

How’s the Weather? Severe Weather Classifications in Syndromic Surveillance

Hurricane ‘Superstorm’ Sandy struck New Jersey on October 29, 2012, causing harm to the health of New Jersey residents and billions of dollars of damage to businesses, transportation, and infrastructure. Monitoring health outcomes for increased illness and injury due to a severe weather event is important in measuring the severity of conditions and the efficacy of state response, as well as in emergency response preparations for future severe weather events.

July 06, 2017

Development and Application of Syndromic Surveillance for Severe Weather Events Following Hurricane Sandy

Following Hurricane Superstorm Sandy, the New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) developed indicators to enhance syndromic surveillance for extreme weather events in EpiCenter, an online system that collects and analyzes real-time chief complaint emergency department (ED) data and classifies each visit by indicator or syndrome.

September 06, 2017

Better, Stronger, Faster: Why Add Fields to Syndromic Surveillance? New Jersey, 2015

In New Jersey, real-time emergency department (ED) data are currently received from EDs by Health Monitoring Systems Inc.’s (HMS) EpiCenter, which collects, manages and analyzes ED registration data for syndromic surveillance, and provides alerts to state and local health departments for surveillance anomalies.

August 23, 2017

Weather Outlook: Cloudy with a Chance of...— Classification of Storm-Related ED Visits

Hurricane ‘Superstorm’ Sandy struck New Jersey on October 29, 2012, causing harm to the health of New Jersey residents and billions of dollars of damage to businesses, transportation, and infrastructure. Monitoring health outcomes for increased illness and injury due to a severe weather event is important in measuring the severity of conditions and the efficacy of state response, as well as in emergency response preparations for future severe weather events.

September 28, 2017

Development of Mental Health Classification Related to Severe Weather Events

Real-time emergency department (ED) data are currently received from 78 of 80 New Jersey acute care and satellite EDs by Health Monitoring Systems Inc.’s (HMS) EpiCenter system. EpiCenter collects, manages and analyzes ED registration data for syndromic surveillance, and provides alerts to state and local health departments for surveillance anomalies.

October 05, 2017

Game Plan: Communicable Disease Surveillance for Super Bowl XLVIII – New Jersey, 2014

In the summer of 2013, the New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) began planning for Super Bowl XLVIII to be held on February 2, 2014, in Met Life Stadium, located in the Meadowlands of Bergen County. Surveillance and epidemiology staff in the Communicable Disease Service (CDS) provided expertise in planning for disease surveillance activities leading up to, during, and after the game. A principal component of NJDOH’s Super Bowl surveillance activities included the utilization of an existing online syndromic surveillance system, EpiCenter.

November 01, 2017

Validation of New Jersey Emergency Department (ED) Registration Data in BioSense 2.0

BioSense 2.0, a redesigned national syndromic surveillance system, provides users with timely regional and national data classified into disease syndromes, with views of health outcomes and trends for use in situational awareness. As of July 2014, there are 60 jurisdictions nationwide feeding data into BioSense 2.0. In New Jersey, the state’s syndromic surveillance system, EpiCenter, receives registration data from 75 of NJ’s 80 acute care and satellite emergency departments. EpiCenter is a system developed by Health Monitoring Systems, Inc.

December 29, 2017

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