Optimization of Linkage between North Carolina EMS and ED Data: EMS Naloxone Cases

The opioid overdose crisis has rapidly expanded in North Carolina (NC), paralleling the epidemic across the United States. The number of opioid overdose deaths in NC has increased by nearly 40% each year since 2015.1 Critical to preventing overdose deaths is increasing access to the life-saving drug naloxone, which can reverse overdose symptoms and progression.

June 18, 2019

Beyond Mortality: Violent Injury Surveillance Using NC DETECT ED Visit Data

Violence-related injuries are a major source of morbidity and mortality in NC. From 2005-2014, suicide and homicide ranked as NC's 11th and 16th causes of death, respectively. In 2014, there were 1,932 total violent deaths, of which 1,303 were due to suicide (67%), 536 due to homicide (28%), and 93 due to another mechanism of violent injury (5%).

January 19, 2018

Informing Public Health Prevention in NC Using Falls Surveillance Data

Falls are a leading cause of fatal and nonfatal injury in NC. As the size of the older adult population is predicted to increase over the next few decades, it is likely that the incidence of falls-related morbidity and mortality will increase in tandem. In order to address this public health emergency, the Injury and Violence Prevention Branch (IVPB) of the NC Division of Public Health has partnered with the Carolina Center for Health Informatics (CCHI) in the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill to perform falls surveillance activities.

January 21, 2018

Using NC DETECT for Comprehensive Morbidity Surveillance on Poisoning and Overdose

A retrospective analysis of emergency department data in NC for drug and opioid overdoses has been explained previously [1]. We built on this initial work to develop new poisoning and surveillance reports to facilitate near real time surveillance by health department and hospital users. In North Carolina, the availability for mortality and hospital discharge data are approximately one and two years after the event date, respectively.

December 20, 2017

Utilization of Emergency Department Data for Drug Overdose Surveillance in North Carolina

In North Carolina there has been an escalation of poisoning deaths. In 2011, the number of fatal poisonings was 1,368 deaths, with 91% classified as drug overdoses with the majority of those due to opioid analgesics.[1] Far greater numbers of drug overdoses result in hospitalization, emergency department (ED) or outpatient clinic visits, or resolve without the individual seeking medical attention. Although public health authorities have long employed death data for drug overdose surveillance in NC, little attention has been paid to the use of ED data for this purpose.

May 02, 2019

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