Updates to the HL7 2.5.1 Implementation Guide for Syndromic Surveillance

In 2011, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released the PHIN Messaging Guide for Syndromic Surveillance v. 1. In the intervening years, new technological advancements including Electronic Health Record capabilities, as well as new epidemiological and Meaningful Use requirements have led to the periodic updating and revision of the Message Guide. These updates occurred through informal and semi-structured solicitation and in response to comments from across public health, governmental, academic, and EHR vendor stakeholders.

June 18, 2019

Use of Diagnosis Code in Mental Health Syndrome Definition

Between 2006 and 2013, the rate of emergency department (ED) visits related to mental and substance use disorders increased substantially. This increase was higher for mental disorders visits (55 percent for depression, anxiety or stress reactions and 52 percent for psychoses or bipolar disorders) than for substance use disorders (37 percent) visits. This increasing number of ED visits by patients with mental disorders indicates a growing burden on the health-care delivery system.

January 19, 2018

HL7 balloting process for the Implementation Guide for Syndromic Surveillance

Syndromic surveillance seeks to systematically leverage health-related data in near "real-time" to understand the health of communities at the local, state, and federal level. The product of this process provides statistical insight on disease trends and healthcare utilization behaviors at the community level which can be used to support essential surveillance functions in governmental public health authorities (PHAs).

January 25, 2018

Updates to the Implementation Guide for Syndromic Surveillance

In 2011, the CDC released the PHIN Implementation Guide (IG) for Syndromic Surveillance v.1 under the Public Health Information Network. In the intervening years, new technological advancements, EHR capabilities as well as epidemiological and Meaningful Use requirements have led to the periodic update and revision of the IG through informal and semi-structured solicitation and collection of comments from across public health, governmental, academic, and EHR vendor stakeholders.

January 25, 2018

Administrative and syndromic surveillance data can enhance public health surveillance

Healthcare data, including emergency department (ED) and outpatient health visit data, are potentially useful to the public health community for multiple purposes, including programmatic and surveillance activities. These data are collected through several mechanisms, including administrative data sources [e.g., MarketScan claims data1; American Hospital Association (AHA) data2] andpublic health surveillance programs [e.g., the National Syndromic Surveillance Program (NSSP)3].

June 20, 2017

New Master Mapping Reference Table (MMRT) to Assist ICD-10 Transition for Syndromic Surveillance

As of October 1, 2015, all HIPAA covered entities transition from the use of International Classification of Diseases version 9 (ICD-9-CM) to version 10 (ICD-10-CM/PCS). Many Public Health surveillance entities receive, interpret, analyze, and report ICD-9 encoded data, which will all be significantly impacted by the transition. Public health agencies will need to modify existing database structures, extraction rules, and messaging guides, as well as revise established syndromic surveillance definitions and underlying analytic and business rules to accommodate this transition.

September 01, 2017

Preliminary Look into the ICD9/10 Transition Impact on Public Health Surveillance

On October 1, 2015, the number of ICD codes will expand from 14,000 in version 9 to 68,000 in version 10. The new code set will increase the specificity of reporting, allowing more information to be conveyed in a single code. It is anticipated that the conversion will have a significant impact on public health surveillance by enhancing the capture of reportable diseases, injuries, and conditions of public health importance that have traditionally been the target of syndromic surveillance monitoring.

September 07, 2017

MapIT - Introduction to Mapping Tool 2015

Many public health programs use hospital administrative and claims data for assessment and surveillance purposes. They are preparing their data collection processes to make the transition from accepting data coded with ICD-9-CM to ICD-10-CM in preparation for the October 1 implementation date set by Congress. MapIT is a tool that was developed with funding from AHRQ and CDC to support these transition efforts.

June 21, 2017

Preparing for the Impact of the ICD-9/10 Transition on Syndromic Surveillance

The US Department of Health and Human Services has mandated that after October 1, 2015, all HIPAA covered entities must transition from using International Classification of Diseases version 9 (ICD- 9) codes to using version 10 (ICD-10) codes (www.cms.gov). This will impact public health surveillance entities that receive, analyze, and report ICD-9 encoded data.

November 17, 2017

Overcoming Operational Differences to Attain a National Picture for Novel Threats

The May arrival of two cases of Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in the US offered CDC’s BioSense SyS Program an opportunity to give CDC’s Emergency Operations Center (EOC) and state-and-local jurisdictions an enhanced national picture of MERS surveillance. BioSense jurisdictions can directly query raw data stored in what is known as “the locker.” However, CDC cannot access these data and critical functions, like creating ad-hoc syndrome definitions within the application are currently not possible. These were obstacles to providing the EOC with MERS information.

November 24, 2017

Pages

Contact Us

NSSP Community of Practice

Email: syndromic@cste.org

 

This website is supported by Cooperative Agreement # 6NU38OT000297-02-01 Strengthening Public Health Systems and Services through National Partnerships to Improve and Protect the Nation's Health between the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of CDC. CDC is not responsible for Section 508 compliance (accessibility) on private websites.

Site created by Fusani Applications