Optimization of Linkage between North Carolina EMS and ED Data: EMS Naloxone Cases

The opioid overdose crisis has rapidly expanded in North Carolina (NC), paralleling the epidemic across the United States. The number of opioid overdose deaths in NC has increased by nearly 40% each year since 2015.1 Critical to preventing overdose deaths is increasing access to the life-saving drug naloxone, which can reverse overdose symptoms and progression.

June 18, 2019

Motor Vehicle Crash (MVC) Case Definitions and How They Impact MVC Surveillance

In 2012, an estimated 2.5 million people presented to the ED for a MVC injury in the U.S. National injury surveillance is commonly captured using E-codes. However, use of E-codes alone to capture MVC-related ED visits may result in a different picture of MVC injuries compared to using text searches of triage or chief compliant notes.

Objective

September 01, 2017

Assessing the Potential Impact of the BioSense 24-hour Rule Using NC DETECT ED Data

Per a frequently asked questions document on the ISDS website, approximately two thirds of HL7 records received in BioSense do not provide a Visit ID. As a result, BioSense data processing rules use the patient ID, facility ID and earliest date in the record to identify a unique visit. If the earliest dates in records with the same patient ID and facility ID occur within the same 24-hour time frame, those two visits are combined into one visit and the earliest date will be stored.

September 28, 2017

Securing protected health information in NC DETECT

NC DETECT receives daily data files from emergency departments (ED), the statewide EMS data collection system, the statewide poison center, and veterinary laboratory test results. Included in these data are elements, which may contain Protected Health Information (PHI). It is the responsibility of NC DETECT to ensure that security of these data is managed during their entire life cycle, including receiving, loading, cleaning, storage, managing, reporting, user access, archiving, and destruction.

June 25, 2019

Using NC DETECT Summary Reports to Share Syndromic Information

The North Carolina Disease Event Tracking and Epidemiologic Collection Tool (NC DETECT) provides early event detection and public health situational awareness to hospital-based and public health users statewide. Authorized users are currently able to view data from emergency departments (n=110), the statewide poison control center, the statewide EMS data system, a regional wildlife center and pilot data from a college veterinary laboratory as well as select urgent care centers.

July 30, 2018

Improving System Ability to Identify Symptom Complexes in Free-Text Data

Text-based syndrome case definitions published by the Center for Disease Control (CDC)1 form the basis for the syndrome queries used by the North Carolina Disease Event Tracking and Epidemiologic Collection Tool (NC DETECT). Keywords within these case definitions were identified by public health epidemiologists for use as search terms with the goal of capturing symptom complexes from free-text chief complaint and triage note data for the purpose of early event detection and situational awareness.

July 30, 2018

Using Business Intelligence Tools to Automate Data Capture and Reporting

The North Carolina Disease Event Tracking and Epidemiologic Collection Tool (NC DETECT) serves public health users across NC at the local, regional and state levels, providing early event detection and situational awareness capabilities. At the state level, our primary users are in the General Communicable Disease Control Branch of the NC Division of Public Health. NC DETECT receives 10 different data feeds daily including emergency department visits, emergency medical service runs, poison center calls, veterinary laboratory test results, and wildlife treatment.

July 30, 2018

North Carolina Bioterrorism and Emerging Infection Prevention System

NC BEIPS is a system designed and developed by the NC Division of Public Health (DPH) for early detection of disease and bioterrorism outbreaks or events. It analyzes emergency department (ED) data on a daily basis from 33 (29%) EDs in North Carolina. With a new mandate requiring the submission of ED data to DPH, NC BEIPS will soon have data from all 114 EDs.

July 30, 2018

Incorporating Wildlife Data into Syndromic Surveillance

The North Carolina Bioterrorism and Emerging Infection Prevention System (NC BEIPS) serves public health users across North Carolina at the local, regional and state levels, providing syndromic surveillance capabilities.  At the state level, our primary users are in the General Communicable Disease Control Branch of the NC Division of Public Health.  NC BEIPS currently receives daily data from the North Carolina Emergency Department Database (NCEDD), Carolina Poison Control Center (CPC), Prehospital Medical Information System (PreMIS) and the Piedmont Wildlife Center (PWC).

July 30, 2018

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Email: syndromic@cste.org

 

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